Mind if we smoke?

We don’t think you will. In fact, we think you’ll thank us for smoking.

You’ll thank Marc for smoking, anyway. Since he got his big opportunity to smoke as much as he wanted at our house, he’s become quite the heavy smoker. Lately, he just can’t seem to quit smoking. Yeah, go figure, it’s a new year and everyone else is making resolutions to quit smoking — and this guy resolves to smoke more. In the past week, especially, Marc has been smoking like crazy.

Meat, that is. (What, you thought we were talking about smoking something else?)

He’s been smoking beef brisket (and if you’ve ever had our brisket, you’ll be delighted to hear that), he’s been smoking ribs, he’s been smoking pork chops, he’s been smoking sausage and he’s been smoking turkey. Now, you can benefit from all his smoking, in the form of this wonderful Choucroûte: an Alsatian smoked meat platter.

Meat platters like this are the quintessential bistro dish in the Alsace-Lorraine region of France, so influenced in the kitchen by Germany: great quantities of smoked meat, roasted to a turn, served with boiled potatoes, sauerkraut and flavorful mustards. This is our version. You get a plateful of smoked ribs, sausage, turkey and a pork chop. On the side, boiled baby potatoes and plenty of sauerkraut, made with Ruth’s special recipe that combines a touch of sugar and bacon to render the shredded cabbage sweet-tart-savory, not sour. The whole thing comes accompanied by two mustards — a hearty grainy mustard and a mellow honey mustard — and we suggest you ask for some bread as well, because you’re going to want some to soak up the sauce and juices. Order up a beer with this, and — ach du Lieber! — you can’t get a more heartwarming or satisfying winter’s meal. It’s on our specials menu this week; you need to get in here and taste it!

If for some reason that doesn’t ring your bell, though, we still have plenty of other delights with which to tempt you. Such as veal osso bucco; roasted half duck with cherry port sauce; long bone double cut pork chops wrapped in bacon and stuffed with prosciutto, Gruyère and apple with port and dried plum ginger sauce; slow braised lamb shank with rosemary-mint demiglace; a spicy jambalaya; four-cheese mac and cheese with smoked chicken and black truffle; Portuguese fisherman’s stew; mahi mahi with raspberry-chipotle glaze…

Come on by and fill your stomach and your soul with a lovingly prepared dish this week. Because at Bistro 185, we smoke ’em if we got ’em.

Julia Project Wine Dinner: a review

Hi, the Tenant is back! I hope you were at the Bistro last night for the Julia Project Wine Dinner, because if you were, you know it was fabulous. If not, here’s a little taste of what you missed (too bad you can’t lick the screen!).

First, to give you an idea of what preparation for the dinner was like back in the kitchen earlier in the day, here’s a little video:

By 6:30 in the evening, everything was ready. Our feast began with the Amuse-Bouche appetizer of Escargot with Toast Batons. I must admit, I’ve been hesitant about trying escargot because it seemed to me from when I had seen preparations at other restaurants that it was a bit rubbery and extremely garlicky. What a surprise to try it at Bistro 185! Their escargot (we received three apiece) were not rubbery at all, and only slightly garlicky — the fresh, slightly earthy flavor of the escargot came through and tasted great with a little squirt of lemon. The hardest part was getting them out of the shells! The toast baton that came with each serving was perfect for soaking up some of that buttery garlic sauce on the plate.

This dish and the following seafood dish, Coquilles St. Jacques, were paired with a Chandon Brut Classic champagne — light, bubbly and crisp. The Coquilles St. Jacques was as delicious as the original Julia Project version, and made extra-special by being served in the classic manner: inside a shell, and surrounded by a “sandy beach” of sea salt and peppercorns. A few shrimp kept the scallops company in the white creamy sauce, and were very good too.

Then it was time for the Boeuf Bourguignon, and was it delightful! First of all, boneless short ribs are some of the most tender, tasty beef you will ever eat, and when they’re braised in this burgundy wine sauce, they’re phenomenal. We all detected a hint of cinnamon in the sauce this time around, and I loved that because cinnamon is a key component of my family’s spaghetti sauce recipe handed down from my father’s father (we suspect there’s a bit of Greek mixed in with our Italian side of the family). It also went especially well with the wine, Bridlewood Central Coast Syrah, a really fascinating wine whose notes and flavors change with every sip. It’s a full-bodied wine that didn’t get in the way of the complex flavors of the dish. And every bite — especially those soaking-up-sauce mushrooms — was exquisite!

After such a heavy dish, though, we needed something light and easy on the stomach, and the Frisee Salad with poached egg, lardons and croutons fit the bill. As Todd mentions in the video, it was finished with a light, gently sweet sherry vinaigrette, and the Bridlewood Reserve Viognier, a slightly flowery, airy white wine, was an ideal complement.

The salad was followed by another one of the popular Julia Project dishes, the Salmon and Halibut en Croûte with Tarragon Beurre Blanc Sauce. As before, the crispy browned puff-pastry crust was shaped like a fish, and enclosed deliciously sauced layers of salmon and halibut accompanied by sautéed asparagus. For this, the accompanying William Hill Chardonnay was, again, just right.

The final entree was a savory-sweet treatment of duck, the Duck Confit with Roasted Figs and Port. This one also was a true taste celebration. The rich fruit flavor went all the way through the crispy skin cradling the tender duck meat, and the combination of kasha and tiny bowtie egg pasta on the side was a good choice for a fall game dish. The wine paired with it was Lapis Luna Romanza Zinfandel, and it was a very good match — a robust red Zin for a dish with such strong flavors.

Last and very welcome, as always: the dessert plate! Here, the mini-chocolate mousses — served with a kind of honey “lollipops” usable as spoons to eat the mousse — were just the beginning. As the video hints (and in some cases shows), there was much more: a delectable little scoop of pumpkin ice cream on cranberry sauce, an apple-nut cake with caramel topping, a square of angel-food cake with raspberry puree and chocolate ganache with a sprinkling of crushed nuts, and a little marzipan candy. The dessert course was served with Presidential 20 Year Porto: a fine finish to an outstanding meal.

Afterward many guests were heard to say that of all the wine dinners they have attended at Bistro 185, this one featured the best pairings of wine to each course. Kudos are definitely due to Superior Beverage Group Ltd. for assisting the Bistro in coming up with and providing these inspired selections. If you weren’t at the dinner last night but would like to learn more about any of these wines, or try one for yourself, ask your server the next time you stop by.

So there you have it: the Julia Project Wine Dinner was a smashing success. If you missed this one, keep an eye on this blog to find out about the Bistro’s next special wine dinner, because whatever and whenever it is, it’s sure to be just as much fun.

Present and future specials: tonight, this weekend, this fall

We have some truly exciting things in mind for the coming weeks! Here’s a preview.

First, tonight’s specials will be basically the same as last night’s. For those wondering what the Soup of the Day is, it’s Chicken Vegetable Tortilla.

Now, for we upcoming weekends, starting tomorrow night, we have some real goodies planned, so make your reservations now if your mouth starts watering!

First, we’re going to feature amongst our specials this weekend a 14-oz. Veal Osso Bucco Cooked with Pureed Fall Root Vegetables, served on a bed of pappardelle pasta.

Then, starting this Friday and Saturday and continuing each weekend through the first two weeks of November, we’re going to offer a Bistro 185 Individual Clambake. It’s just like any other clambake, only each one is personal-sized: big enough for just you! Each person who orders a Personal Clambake will receive his or her own potful of goodies cooked in clam broth, including a “maris section” crab leg (the portion between the knuckle and the claw), a South African lobster tail, jumbo shrimp, clams, mussels, scallops, chicken thighs, redskin potatoes, and corn on the cob. Your clambake will be served with cornbread and melted butter so you can enjoy it to the fullest!

But that’s not all we’re working on that’s new and special. This Monday, October 12, the Bistro introduces its new Fall Menu, featuring some specials we think you’re really going to love. Here are some of the items we have planned:

House-Smoked Chicken with Four-Cheese Macaroni and Cheese: Replacing our Limoncello Chicken summer special, this treat will star our own smoked chicken with a combination of Gruyère, Brie, Emmenthaler and Parmesan cheeses on medium shell pasta, with black truffle, finished with a bit of white truffle oil. We like to call it “Ultimate Mac & Cheese.” We think you will, too.

Duck Three-Way: We’ve served duck the same way here at the Bistro since we opened. Time to change things up! That’s what we’ll be doing with this new dish: a duck ragout with a confit, served with a quarter roasted duck and sliced smoked duck breast. This creation will most likely be presented on a bed of pappardelle pasta.

Gumbo of the Week: We will feature a new and different gumbo each week. Next week’s will combine shrimp, chicken and andouille sausage.

Seafood Stews: We’ll be rotating a variety of seafood stews through our specials, influenced by different regions and countries, such as Thailand and Italy.

Cassoulets: Look for a rotating variety of cassoulets, including classic French and seafood.

Risottos: We’ll also rotate a variety of risottos highlighting various ingredients.

Julia Project Classics: We’ll rotate some of the most popular dishes we served during the Julia Project back through our fall menu.

A few items that are already on our specials, and have earned a permanent place throughout our fall menu, are our two most popular Julia Project dishes of all: the Lamb Shank with Baby Fall Vegetables and the Pork Tenderloin with Port and Prunes. We will also continue to offer our Calves’ Liver entree, which recently won Scene Magazine’s Best in Cleveland award for Best Liver That’s Not Foie Gras.

In the future, also look for another very special dish: Cornish Hen Wrapped in Bacon with a Ginger-Maple Glaze, Acorn Squash, Brussels Sprouts, Pecans, Roasted Shallots and Roasted Garlic.

To learn more about our fall menu, and to keep up with the nightly specials, keep checking this space. You won’t want to miss anything!


Greatest Hits: Chicken Pot Pie

We apologize for no posts yesterday. We must have suffered a technical glitch in which we thought yesterday’s post posted, but it didn’t. Anyway, we do hope you stopped in to enjoy the Pork Tenderloin with Port and Prunes, whether to reexperience it or to find out why it was a sellout if you missed it the first time (you can revisit our posts about the dish here and here).

Tonight, we’re reprising the perfect dish for this cold, rainy Cleveland weather: Chicken Pot Pie! Read about it here and here, then come in from the chill and enjoy a hot and delicious comfort dish Julia-style.

Julia Project, Week 8: Return to your favorites!

Here they are: your favorites, our biggest sellers and most popular dishes from the Julia Project, back for our final week:

Monday, September 28 — Fricasee de Poulet a L’ancienne (We will also feature last night’s Yellowtail Snapper as a reprise dish)

Tuesday, September 29 — Pork Tenderloin with Port and Prunes

Wednesday, September 30 — Chicken Pot Pie

Thursday, October 1 — Paella with Chicken, Lobster and Clams

Friday, October 2 — Lamb Shanks with Baby Fall Vegetables

Saturday, October 3 — Lamb Moussaka

Whether you come in to enjoy one of your best-loved dishes again or to taste one you missed earlier, we hope to see you this week!

Behind the Dish: Pork Tenderloin with Port and Prunes

Our Pork Tenderloin with Port and Prunes is yet another adaptation from Julia Child’s cookbook with Jacques Pépin, Julia and Jacques Cooking at Home. In our version of the dish, we’re using pitted dried plums as the prunes, and instead of the black currant jam called for in the original recipe, we’re substituting blackberry preserves and plum preserves. Otherwise, we’re keeping to Julia and Jacques’ recipe: sautéeing chunks of perfectly trimmed pork tenderloin until they’re seared brown, adding shallots, deglazing the pan with red wine vinegar, then adding brown stock, ketchup, the preserves, the port and the prunes to the developing sauce (the preserves help thicken and add flavor to it). A fresh parsley and basil garnish provides the finish.

We’re serving our pork with an ideal accompaniment: Israeli couscous, which is larger than the tiny and yellow North African couscous you may have enjoyed in many dishes. Israeli couscous pearls are about the size of barley pearls or Italian orzo pasta, and they will absorb the flavor of this sauce beautifully. Which is good, because we don’t want you to miss a drop.

If you try making this kind of dish at home, keep in mind that just as with Beef Bourguignon, browning the meat properly is crucial. That means making sure it’s dry and well trimmed, and that you’re not trying to cook too many chunks at once. Better to cook in batches than to try to cook too much at a time and not get the proper caramelization you want. Also, this is one time when you definitely don’t want a non-stick pan. Ideally, as you remove the pork temporarily from the pan to make the sauce, the meat will stick to the pan a bit, leaving brown bits behind for the deglazing process. Stainless steel and anodized aluminum work well.

Of course, we hope that now that you’ve read about it, you’ll be eager to taste it. We’re happy to oblige!

Chicken Pot Pie hits the jackpot

Warm, creamy sauce, tender chicken and vegetables, and a delightful melding of flavors and aromas provided by the herbs from our rooftop garden, all under a flaky puff pastry crust…that’s Bistro 185 Chicken Pot Pie. It just may be on the lunch menu tomorrow, too…but why take the chance of missing out?

If you like this dish from Julia and Jacques Cooking at Home, you shouldn’t miss tomorrow’s either: Pork Tenderloin with Port and Prunes. We haven’t presented a Julia treatment of pork as yet, so this should be special.

A preview of Week 3

We hope you were able to join us last night for Veal Marengo — tender veal in a flavorful tomato-and-mushroom sauce. Whether you were or weren’t, however, we’re preparing another treat for tonight: Loup en Croûte — Fish in Pastry, with hollandaise sauce and haricots verts (good old-fashioned green beans).

Julia Project Menu Week 3 is Ready!

It just keeps getting better! Here’s what we have planned for next week:

Monday, August 17 — Salmon Filet en Papillote with Shallots and Tomato, Julia and Jacques Cooking at Home, Page 220

Tuesday, August 18 — Chicken Pot Pie, Julia and Jacques Cooking at Home, Page 278

Wednesday, August 19 — Pork Tenderloin with Port and Prunes, Julia and Jacques Cooking at Home, Page 358

Thursday, August 20 — Home Made Veal Sausage with Scalloped Potatoes, Julia and Jacques Cooking at Home, Page 364

Friday, August 21 — Chocolate Burnt Almond Ice Cream, Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Volume 2, Page 421

Saturday, August 22 — Steak Diane, Julia and Jacques Cooking at Home, Page 314

In the French tradition — minus about three weeks — Bistro 185 will be closed for our annual summer vacation from August 24 through the 29th. We will reopen Monday, August 31, bringing more Julia Project dishes with us!